Welcome to St. Johns Center for Clinical Research


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 1,000 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


Arthritis

Did You Know?
Osteoarthritis (OA) occurs when the protective cartilage between bones narrows and wears down. The most commonly affected joints are in the hands, knees, hips and spine. OA affects millions of people world-wide and is the leading cause of chronic disability in the U.S. 
Breakthrough new treatments may reduce symptoms and slow the progression of the disease! 
Call today to find out more about how research may provide relief for HIP or KNEE pain..
(904) 209-3173
 
 


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Our Staff

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Lori Alexander

Lori is the site director for St. Johns Center for Clinical Research. She is also a registered dietitian and past president of the Jacksonville Dietetic Association. She is a founding member of the Florida Lipid Association and is currently serving as the President of the Southeast Lipid Association. 

Not only does Lori know a lot about lipids and lipid management, she is a national champion in Karate with a 4th degree black belt. Her expertise in martial arts also includes Taekwondo, Tai Chi and kickboxing. She is an avid outdoors-woman who enjoys hiking, biking, camping, and hang-gliding. 

Lori is a wine connoisseur and enjoys travelling to wine country as well as to visit family in Wisconsin and Minnesota. She and her husband have two young adult children who also live in the north Florida area.

Lastest Blog Post:


Over 50? Here Is Why You Should Be Concerned About Deadly Diarrhea and C. Diff!

Ask anyone who has had a Clostridium difficile (C. difficile, or C. diff) infection and they will probably tell you that it was one of the worst experiences of their life. Imagine the worst flu you’ve ever had but on steroids! C. diff is affectionately referred to as “deadly diarrhea” and with symptoms such as watery diarrhea 10 to 15 times a day that’s no joke! It can also come with a multitude of other symptoms such as: severe abdominal pain/cramping, rapid heart rate, fever, blood or pus in the stool, nausea, dehydration, and kidney failure.

 

What is C. Diff?

C. diff is one of the many different types of bacteria that lives in our intestines. It may sound gross but bacteria in your intestines are completely normal and you need a good balance of them to remain healthy. When something such as antibiotic use throws off the balance in your intestines C. diff may start to grow out of control and begin release toxins that attack the lining of the intestines which leads to that deadly diarrhea.

Is C. Diff contagious?

C. diff is contagious, so even if you were not recently on antibiotics, you can still catch C. diff by contact with a contaminated surface. Spores from C. diff bacteria come from human feces, soil, water and animal feces. These spores can also live for weeks or months outside the body.

Who is at risk?

C. diff is most often associated with doctor or healthcare facility visits or recent antibiotic use. There is a higher risk for adults ages 50 and over, especially those that have frequent doctor visits or have had any type of recent surgery or a hospitalization.

What can you do to lower your risk?

Good handwashing practices, especially after doctor or healthcare facility visits are a great start to lowering your risk of getting a C. diff infection. Another way is to take probiotics daily anytime you take an antibiotic. The reason for this is because when you take an antibiotic it not only kills off the bad bacteria, but it also kills off the good bacteria, giving C. diff a chance to thrive. Taking a probiotic, even if it’s just store bought yogurt, helps feed and rebalance your good gut bacteria. These are not fool proof, but they may help.

A Vaccine to prevent C. Diff?

While Handwashing and probiotics are certainly a must, researchers agree they are still not enough when it comes to preventing this life-threatening infection. Which is why we are involved in a cutting-edge research study working on the development of a new vaccine for C. diff prevention. If you are interested in volunteering, this study is for people ages 50 and up who have been recently hospitalized, have an upcoming surgery, or have frequent healthcare contact. If you are not sure if you qualify, please give our office a call or sign up here and we will be glad to answer any questions!

Fleming Island Center for Clinical Research

904-621-0390


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