Welcome to St. Johns Center for Clinical Research


Clinical trials move medicine forward. Sponsors, such as pharmaceutical companies, governments and foundations fund medical research. Patients who participate in clinical research receive many advantages including treatment at no cost, access to expertise and resources such as expensive tests. Research volunteers shape the future and can have fun while helping others and themselves.

 

As a premier clinical research organization, we have conducted more than 2,500 clinical trials over 20 years and have worldwide recognition for providing patients access to cutting edge medical research. If you have a medical issue and want a research solution, or if you are a healthy volunteer, come visit our center and learn more. One of our experts will be happy to evaluate you.


Shape the Future

Clinical research is a process that gives back. Volunteers generate information that improves future health care outcomes for everyone.

Find relief with new treatments

Volunteers join research to seek relief from affliction and to better understand their conditions with support from our caring team.

Programs Offer Resources or Pay

Study participants receive medical tests, services, counseling and treatment at no charge. These measures may be unavailable to the general public!


We do research in many areas


Low Testosterone

Low Testosterone Research

Qualified volunteers may receive at no cost:
  • investigational medication
  • study-related care from a local doctor
  • possible compensation
Health insurance isn’t required to participate.
Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information

(904) 209-0043

 

Hot Flashes

Hot Flashes Research

Qualified volunteers may receive at no cost:
  • investigational medication
  • study-related care from a local doctor
  • possible compensation
Health insurance isn’t required to participate.
Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information
(904) 209-3173
Or sign up below!





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Watch what they have to say about their research experience!



Postpartum Depression Research Testimonial
Phase 1 Research Joe's Experience
Phase I Research Terry's Experience

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Our Staff

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Lastest Blog Post:


PCSK9: The Real Problem Behind Cholesterol

 
Cholesterol has earned a bad reputation over the years. However, it is required by every part of your body for day to day functions. In fact, cholesterol is so important to daily function, that every cell in the body can make cholesterol from basic materials, except your eyelashes! So how do you reconcile these two completely different ideas? The cholesterol that circulates in your blood stream is the extra stuff that your body is trying to get rid of. This extra cholesterol is what can cause damage to arteries, heart disease, and increase your risk for stroke.  
 
So, what is cholesterol? It is a type of waxy, fat-like substance, also called a lipid.  Since cholesterol is a fat, it can't travel alone in the bloodstream. It would end up as useless globs (imagine bacon fat floating in a pot of water). To get around this problem, the body packages cholesterol and other lipids into minuscule protein-covered particles that mix easily with blood. These tiny particles, called lipoproteins (lipid plus protein), move cholesterol and other fats throughout the body. 
 
LDL (low-density lipoprotein) is considered the “bad”, unhealthy cholesterol that can build up in the arteries and form deposits called plaques.
 
HDL (high-density lipoprotein) is the “good”, healthy kind of cholesterol that transports excess LDL cholesterol to the liver to be removed from the body.  
PCSK9 is a protein in our body that regulates the circulating levels of LDL “bad” cholesterol.  Decreasing the PCSK9 proteins in the body will reduce LDL levels and reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke.
 
There are currently two FDA approved medications that have been very successful in blocking the PCSK9 protein once it has been made.  They are Repatha and Praluent.  However, the medications are expensive and not approved for all patients under their insurance.  
 
Scientists believe it would be even more powerful to prevent the PCSK9 protein from being made in the first place. Currently being studied are a new class of molecules called antisense oligonucleotides (ASO).  ASOs are pieces of DNA that short-circuit the production of PCSK9, resulting in reduced LDL levels and associated risks. 
 
When you participate in a clinical research study, you gain access to these types of cutting-edge therapies at no cost and before the general population. Contact us to schedule a free consultation to see if you qualify for one of our clinical research studies. If you qualify for one of our clinical trials, your health will be closely monitored by our team of expert medical professionals throughout the trial.

 
 
1. https://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/how-its-made-cholesterol-production-in-your-body
 

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